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Physical modelling not only allows designers to explore and test their ideas, but to also present them to others. Engaging clients, focus groups and experts to interact with physical models of products allows designers to gain valuable feedback that enable them to improve the design and product-user interface.

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Each Nescafé cap is 3-D printed and assembled in California, and contains a miniature Arduino, LED lights, and a tiny speaker. The Alarm Cap will wake you up in the morning with relaxing light patterns and soothing sounds, such as, says, the warbling of morning birds. To turn off the alarm, you screw off the cap.

Each Nescafé cap is 3-D printed and assembled in California, and contains a miniature Arduino, LED lights, and a tiny speaker. The Alarm Cap will wake you up in the morning with relaxing light patterns and soothing sounds, such as, says, the warbling of morning birds. To turn off the alarm, you screw off the cap.

 

An interesting concept and a clever bit of marketing, however technology and modelling using 3D printers and programmable computer chip sets has allowed this concept to come to fruition, even if on a small scale.

 

Each Nescafé cap is 3-D printed and assembled in California, and contains a miniature Arduino, LED lights, and a tiny speaker. The Alarm Cap will wake you up in the morning with relaxing light patterns and soothing sounds, such as, say, the warbling of morning birds. To turn off the alarm, you screw off the cap.

 

“It’s the perfect example of a big brand embracing the technologies of the maker movement and showcasing how the accessibility of 3-D printing and Arduino-based electronics allow for beautifully designed objects and experiences,” says Aw.

 

Although it’s a clever concept, the Nescafé Alarm Cap isn’t exactly going to hit supermarket shelves any time soon. It’s purely promotional, and is being distributed by Nescafé Mexico to media personalities, politicians, and celebrities. Only 200 have been made so far.

 

Yet when components like Arduino chips and speakers become cheap enough—and they’re dropping in price all the time—there’s no reason that companies couldn’t start adding innovative little twists to their packaging this way. From the coffee we drink to our morning breakfast cereal, how long until everything you can buy in the grocery store is a multimedia experience?

 

Read more @ FastCoDesign